Tag Archives: vacation

Thursday in NYC

By the numbers:

13,374 steps Thursday.

2 meetings with songwriters.

1 show.

And 1 most extraordinary dessert.

Amy’s Bread had a butterscotch cashew bar calling my name.  I succumbed.

And speaking of succumbing, Hello, Dolly! was a paroxysm of delight.  Bette Miller is out this week; I saw Donna Murphy in the title role.

While Miss Murphy’s voice may be ever-so-gently frayed, her energy, spunk, spirit, and timing — and her legs — are intact. And I loved her.

This revival had me in tears of joy a couple of times.  Kate Baldwin is glorious as Miss Milloy; Gavin Creel, a most engaging Cornelius.  I could not erase the memory of Josh Borgmeyer (may he rest in peace) as I watched Taylor Trensch as Cornelius, though.  

One of the stunners of this current revival is the chorus — rich, glamorous, able to move as a unity, and full-throated.  “Sunday Clothes” will never be bettered, visually or aurally.

Holiday

My 2.5-week summer holiday has commenced, as of the close of the work-day yesterday.

Unlike other summers where I’ve taken a full four weeks away from the office, I’m departing for a shorter term this year, since I am music-directing two different shows and only have 1.5 weeks off between the end of The Sweet Smell of Success and the start of rehearsals for Out on Broadway: The Third Coming.

But summer holiday is filled, as usual.  I’m off to NYC next week, for a short visit and some research.  Then I have a dash over to Lee’s Summit and on to Des Moines to see Billy Budd at Des Moines Opera.


The next few weeks, until August 10 or so, are still three-days-in-office, and some long weekends.  I still have reading to do, and music to compose, and local tourism to do!


But I wish I were abroad this summer . . . .

Art Institute of Chicago

The view upon leaving the Art Institute on Sunday.

Most any trip to Chicago includes some time at the Art Institute of Chicago, called by some the greatest museum in the world.  I never tire of the Impressionists, of the miniature rooms, of the great masters, of the architecture collection, of the paperweight collection.

Hello, old friend.

Hello, old friend.

This trip included the America After the Fall exhibition, the collection of modernist chairs, and some Napoleon stuff.  And my old friends Messrs. Seurat and Monet.


From the 1930’s American exhibition, viewed during a private members-only morning:

Edward Hopper, 1939. New York Movie. This painting is filled with incredible suggestive detail.

Edward Hopper, 1939. New York Movie. This painting is filled with incredible suggestive detail.

I loved the symmetry of the view: a visitor and the painting he observes.

I loved the symmetry of the view: a visitor and the painting he observes.

Edward Hopper, 1940. Detail of Gas.

Edward Hopper, 1940. Detail of Gas.

Grant Wood. American Gothic.

Grant Wood. American Gothic.

Alice Neel, 1935. Detail of Pat Whelan.

Alice Neel, 1935. Detail of Pat Whelan.

Charles Sheeler, 1931. Classic Landscape.

Charles Sheeler, 1931. Classic Landscape.

Thomas Hart Benton, 1938. Cradling Wheat.

Thomas Hart Benton, 1938. Cradling Wheat.

Thomas Hart Benton, 1938. Detail of Haystack.

Thomas Hart Benton, 1938. Detail of Haystack.

Grant Wood, 1932. Daughters of Revolution.

Grant Wood, 1932. Daughters of Revolution.

Paul Cadmus, 1934. The Fleet's In. Notice the prim lady at the left, and her dog.

Paul Cadmus, 1934. The Fleet’s In. Notice the prim lady at the left, and her dog.

Paul Sample, 1933. Church Supper. I love the sly glances at the lady in pink.

Paul Sample, 1933. Church Supper. I love the sly glances at the lady in pink.

 

Vacation ends

Truth be told, I only had off eight working days over the past two fortnights.  Such is the life of an administrator.

And over the holiday break between semesters, I’ve dealt with a dozen and a half church services, a few days away with family, a leak in the bathroom, a dead dishwasher, cabinets falling off the kitchen wall, and prep for the foundation repair that starts tomorrow.

Three Webster kids descended at 5.25 p.m. tonight to help.  Twenty minutes later, they had moved everything in the basement that needed moving.  I fed them homemade lasagna and panna cotta in thanks.

I also coached five students today on audition music for tomorrow’s theatre auditions at Webster.

Tonight?  Downton Abbey, and putting my latest choral music in Finale.

Pics from the week:

Vacation

And just like that, with snow blowing in a howling wind, I am on vacation.

Leaving the office at 1.15 today, I said goodbye to Jean, looked once more at my boxed-up office awaiting a move in two weeks, checked in with the Boss, and drove home.

A grilled cheese sandwich and some chips comprised my lunch – a perfect wintry day meal.

Hallelujah for vacations!

Away day in Hannibal

Beth has been hoping to visit Hannibal with her children, since the kids have never been and Beth has not been back to Hannibal since she was 18.  So I drove up this morning to meet them and play tour guide.

We lived in Hannibal when I was in elementary school, moving away toward the end of my fourth grade year.  Beth barely remembers living there, since she was just turned four when we left.  So today, Beth had some very jumbled memories of the two houses I remember, of where Dorothy Watson lived, and the Gruber house, and of Fifth Street Baptist Church, and so on.

We had a fun day, taking in all the Mark Twain & Tom Sawyer stuff, climbing up Cardiff Hill to the lighthouse, going up to Lovers Leap, touring Mark Twain cave, and playing on the banks of the Mississippi from the Illinois side.

And, five minutes shy of 12 hours away, I was back home!