Tag Archives: family

A beautiful read

Read this.  Then read it again if you have pubescent children.  Then again if you have grandchildren.  Then again just because.

https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-tell-my-wonderful-11-year-old-son-in-a-way-that-won-t-tear-him-down-that-the-way-he-has-started-talking-to-me-disrespectfully-makes-me-not-want-to-be-around-him-I-ve-already-told-him-the-bad-attitude-is/answer/Jo-Eberhardt

My sister Karen

My sister Karen is another year older today.

This photo is from G-ma’s house in Adrian, and looks like it was most likely taken at her fifth birthday.  G-ma made an angel food cake in the shape of a butterfly.

I’m at left, age 7.  Beth is in the middle, more interested in the cake at 21 months old. Karen is at right.

Happy birthday, Karen!

#Reminiscences: nieces and nephews

Two nephews and a niece each have birthdays this month.

I recall visiting Karen in the hospital after Blayne was born. He is the first child born to either of my sisters, and that made his birth truly special.

Anna is the niece born in November.  Her birth, right at Thanksgiving, was welcomed by my parents on a brief furlough from Argentina.  (That trip would be the last time any of us saw Mom, since she died not long after, in Argentina.) I visited Beth in the hospital the day after Thanksgiving, if I recall correctly.

And then Joseph came along fourteen years ago.  I was in Muncie, Indiana at the time, as had to wait a few weeks to great the last of the nephews.

1995. JC with Karen’s kids, Blayne and Kristen, at the Ringling Bros. circus at Kemper Arena.
With my nephews Luke and Joseph last summer (2009), waiting for the Amtrak home.
2000. A very young Anna at my doctoral hooding ceremony.

Random musings

. . . that moment when you realize it’s your parents’ 60th wedding anniversary, and they only made it 38 years before Mom died, and you just start crying because you forgot the anniversary, and suddenly you miss her more than your father, and years of grief wash over you again . . . .

That was my Friday about 12.45 p.m.


I find it odd.  The optometrist can mail me my prescription, or fax it to me, both of which can be intercepted by others, but because of FERPA laws cannot email a PDF copy, even though that is likely the most secure way to send my scrip to me.


Thank you to students who helped move furniture on Friday as we got some new/used items for Thompson House!


All the best-laid plans of chefs and cooks go out the window during the first week of school.  Other people have been doing my cooking.


And speaking of the first week of school, we exceeded our expected music-major headcount.  Significantly exceeded. My expectations for slippage were inaccurate.  Rejoicing abounds!

Second-highest total number of music majors in two generations of students . . . .


The number of cars driving around Saint Louis with expired temporary tags — some expired for months — astounds me.


I may or may not be making a surprise visit somewhere south of Saint Louis today.


Tornado sirens and green-gray skies on a Friday afternoon make for an eerie end of the week.


love my new office configuration.  And my new desk chair.


And I love teaching voice lessons.  One new Webster student started Friday. The light bulbs popping on above his head were copious and a balm for a weary administrator’s eyes.  I still have my teaching chops.


Beware.  More new eyeglasses are on their way.

#GunclesDay

So apparently yesterday was Gay Uncles Day.

My friend Ken reminded me that we should be receiving cards and gifts from our nieces and nephews.  (Alas . . . .)

So in honor, here’s photos of me with the blood relative (for I have numerous adopted) nieces and nephews over the years, and some photos I’ve taken of them:

#TBT: grandmothers

During my visit home last week, Beth gave me two photos that I don’t recall seeing before.

I was the eldest grandchild on my father’s side, and the second eldest on my mother’s side.  Both of my grandmothers doted on me, and as I grew they both loved that I was musical, since they were too.  Grandma Carter played violin, and sang often at funerals in De Soto, where she lived.  Grandma Blocher played piano (her gift of a down-payment on a Baldwin spinet piano allowed us to have a piano at home for me to practice on) and sang for decades in the Baptist church choir.

This one was cropped so that it might be placed in the corner of a picture frame, or a mirror.  I’m with Grandma Blocher, who we all called G-ma:

From about the same age, I’m with Grandma Carter, joyful at what was clearly a Christmas present: