And I’m away

Sunday — transit to Washington, D.C., and a bit of tourist time

Monday — meeting with staff at National Association of Schools of Music; transit by train to NYC

Tuesday and Wednesday — in NYC with Yufei, and beloved former students

Thursday — transit home, stopping at Midway in Chicago

Morocco

So I did a thing.

I rather impetuously booked passage to Tangier, “a Moroccan port on the Strait of Gibraltar, which has been a strategic gateway between Africa and Europe since Phoenician times” according to Wikipedia.

I leave on Monday, February 18, less than two weeks from now.

The trip will include a cooking class (of course!), a long day-trip to Casablanca, and plenty of tourist time in the Kasbah and the medina.

The return connection gives me a late afternoon/evening and an overnight in Madrid, Spain.

A year ago, I put aside some inheritance money to help me have an international holiday.  The original plan, Bangkok and Saigon, was scrubbed when I took the Circus Harmony gig.  But over this last weekend, I realized that I had a window of about a week that I could use for travel before my sabbatical ended.  And Morocco has long been on the list.  I chose Tangier because of the climate, the ocean, and the option to have a night in Spain.  And Casablanca is a rapid-train excursion away.

This will be my first trip to Africa.

Cape Spartel, where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean.

Criticizing

Theodore Roosevelt said

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.

— The Kansas City Star, 7 May 1918